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Institute for Vaccine Safety

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

615 N. Wolfe Street

Room W5041

Baltimore, MD 21205

www.vaccinesafety.edu

 

Recommended Adult Immunization Schedule
Ages 19 Years and older

UNITED STATES • 2013

 

Age
 Vaccine

19-21 Years

22-26 Years

 27-49 Years

 50-59 Years

60-64 Years 

≥ 65 Years 

Influenza

Get a flu vaccine every year: a

Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, (Td/Tdap)

Get a Tdap once, then a Td booster every 10 years: b

Varicella (Chickenpox)

2 doses

HPV for Women

3 doses: c

 HPV for Men: c

3 doses

3 doses

Zoster (Shingles)

 

 

 

 

1 dose

Measles, Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

1 or 2 doses: d

 

Pneumococcal (pneumonia): e

1 or 2 doses

1 dose

Meningococcal

1 or more doses

Hepatitis A

2 doses

Hepatitis B

3 doses

Recommended for all adults unless  your health care provider  tells you that you cannot safely receive the vaccine.   Recommended for adults with certain risks.  Talk to your health care provider to see if you are at higher risk.  
     
a. There are four different flu vaccines available—talk to your doctor or nurse about which flu vaccine is right for you.
b. Pregnant women are recommended to get Tdap vaccine with each pregnancy to increase protection for infants who are too young for vaccination but at highest risk for severe illness and death from pertussis (whooping cough)
c. There are two different kinds of HPV vaccine but only one HPV vaccine (Gardasil) can be given to men. Gay men or men who have sex with men who are 22 - 26 years old should get HPV vaccine if they haven’t already started or completed the series.
d. If you were born in 1957 or after, and don't have a record of being vaccinated or having had these infections, talk to your doctor or nurse about how many doses you may need.
e. There are two different types of pneumococcal vaccine: PCV13 and PPSV23. Talk with your doctor or nurse to find out if one or both pneumococcal vaccines are recommended for you.

If you are traveling outside of the United States, you may need additional vaccines. Ask your doctor or nurse which vaccines you may need.  
     
 

This page was last updated on November 22, 2013